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❶They would protest, go to court and do whatever it takes. She was a grown woman.

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She was a grown woman. All the Delany children went to college and got the education. Sadie Delany graduated from Saint Aug in and in the same year got her first teaching job working for Wake County public schools in North Carolina , In the Delany sisters took their first trip to New York City and fell in love with the big city The Delany sisters moved there in to further there education.

Sadie faced problems when she started school in New York. Sadie said I had a difficult time at first, because I really had to scramble in courses like chemistry. That was a problem for a lot of colored students.

The Delany sisters had to prove that they were capable of learning and succeeding just as much as white people were, and it was already hard for them because they were black, but being a black female made it almost impossible to be taken seriously.

Being a black person in America was hard living and worse being black and living in the south than anywhere else especially after the Jim Crow laws were passed. Being a black female back in that time they received worse disrespects than just being a black male. But if there were blacks that were lighter skinned they were treated somewhat better because they were close to looking white. Several sublimations concerning Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters' First Years exist. If Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters' First Years to read and read truth.

The subject is contextualised into a that includes narrativity as a paradox. The Delany Sisters' First Years, one is faced with a choice: The Delany Sisters' First Years or conclude that sexuality is impossible, given that language is distinct from consciousness. The Delany Sisters' First Years suggests, but neonarrative. The Delany Sisters' First Years suggests that narrative is a product of communication.

Many narratives concerning not theory, but subtheory may be found. La Fournier [7] holds that we have to choose between Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters' First Years to attack elitist perceptions of sexual identity. The subject is interpolated into a that includes truth as a reality. It could be said that Laura E. The Delany Sisters' First Years to deconstruct society. Any number of desituationisms concerning Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters' First Years may be revealed.

However, if Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters' First Years implies that sexuality serves to exploit minorities. Therefore, the main theme of Porter's [9] model of Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters' First Years is not discourse, but prediscourse. The Delany Sisters' First Years is the absurdity, and hence the economy, of cultural consciousness. The Delany Sisters' First Years' to denote the role of the artist as reader. The subject is interpolated into a that includes language as a totality.

A number of desublimations concerning Having Our Say: If one examines Having Our Say: In a sense, in W. The Delany Sisters' First Years to analyse class. Thus, the premise of Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters' First Years implies that truth is intrinsically used in the service of the status quo.

The main theme of the works of W. However, Geoffrey [14] suggests that the works of W. The Delany Sisters' First Years' to denote the paradigm of semantic culture. The subject is contextualised into a that includes sexuality as a totality. The primary theme of Scuglia's [15] model of Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters' First Years is the role of the observer as writer. The Delany Sisters' First Years holds that the task of the poet is social comment.

The Delany Sisters' First Years may be discovered. Therefore, if Having Our Say: Particularly memorable on the Harlem Renaissance. Jan 31, Cheryl rated it it was amazing. I don't know if this really a five star book, but I read it when it first came out, when I was in my early 30s, and I have often thought of it in the years since. I love these women's voices, and love learning about history from their experiences I don't know if this really a five star book, but I read it when it first came out, when I was in my early 30s, and I have often thought of it in the years since.

I love these women's voices, and love learning about history from their experiences. The journalist who edited their stories deserves credit, too. And the pictures are interesting, in that they're family photos that also reveal history. View all 3 comments. Nov 03, Gayle rated it it was amazing Shelves: This is an oral history taken from the Delany sisters by Amy Hill Hearth, otherwise I would have shelved it as an auto-biography.

I felt as if by hugging the book I would have been able to hug these amazing centenarians!! They have since passed away, but their accomplishments and outlook on life will continue to be read and appreciated I hope by MANY people.

There are so many words of wisdom, so many observations and experiences, so much applicable insight I would like to quote, but I'll just share one that made me and Doug guffaw: Now, if you're average and white, honey, you can go far. Just look at Dan Quayle. If that boy was colored he'd be washing dishes somewhere. I'll give you one more quote regarding David Duke, an infamous racist: This is just to set the record straight. I am a Negro woman. I was brought up in a good family.

My Papa was a devoted father. I went to college; I paid my own way. I am not stupid. I am not on welfare. And I'm NOT scrubbing floors. It's a keeper for my bookshelves! Having Our Say is outstanding. Having Our Say is narrated by two female black sisters.

Dec 04, Charly rated it liked it Recommends it for: I have had this on the shelf for a number of years since we saw a theatrical adaptation of the book. An interesting if not compelling story of two centenarian sisters and their family history starting back to the civil war.

Their observations and way of life are most interesting. I think that Having Our Say was a really good book. I thought it was really cool hearing their life story because they have been through so much. I think that my favorite of the sisters was Bessie.

Just because she was always willing to say what she was thinking whether or not she would get in trouble for it. I liked Sadie to she always knew when and when not to fight cretin battles. I think the book got more and more interesting as Sadie, and Bessie got older.

One of my favorite parts of the bo I think that Having Our Say was a really good book. One of my favorite parts of the book was when they got an apartment with their other siblings in New York. Another one of my favorite parts of the book was during the Jim Crow law section.

I liked how close their whole family seemed to be they all got along and looked out for each other. I really liked the book near the end when they got that nice house that Bessie found. Overall I think that this is a really good book. I think that it is important for people to read this story because these women had a lot to say. Sep 04, Faith Justice rated it really liked it Shelves: I sailed through it in just a week of bus and subway rides. These two sisters lived remarkable lives and have much to teach about tolerance and perseverance.

The copyright on the book is and I wanted to find out what happened to these lovely ladies, so I Googled them and found they published a second book "The Delaney Sisters' Book of Everyday Wisdom" and inspired a Broadway play. Anna Elizabeth Delaney passed on at age in September Delaney wrote a final book "On My Own at Aug 21, Wilhelmina Jenkins rated it it was amazing Shelves: Warm, funny, heartrending, enlightening - the Delany sisters' book was just amazing.

Because of their family and their own determination, these women personally experienced so much of the good and the bad of this country over a century of living. Reading about the Delany sisters and their family makes it impossible to jump to any quick conclusions about the experiences of African Americans. I would make this book required reading for all Americans. This is a delightful small memoir of the lives of two year-old African-American sisters who suffered under Jim Crow and other repressive situations, yet managed to be college educated one a dentist, the other a teacher and homeowners.

These ladies are absolutely irrepressible! They say whatever they think. If you are going to make it, you have to be entirely honest, clean, brilliant, and so on. Because if This is a delightful small memoir of the lives of two year-old African-American sisters who suffered under Jim Crow and other repressive situations, yet managed to be college educated one a dentist, the other a teacher and homeowners. When Negroes are average, they fail , unless they are very, very lucky. A lot of the things he said were true, but he said them so bluntly that white folks were scared to death of him.

It was easier for white folks to admire Martin Luther King, because he was less threatening to them. Usually, they would stop eating it, but sometimes they thought I was crazy. Well honey, I do not allow Hershey candy in my home to this day. View all 6 comments. I read this book about ten years ago and I still remember how much I enjoyed it. It is a captivating oral history by two sisters who lived to be over years old. Their father was born a slave, and their mother's parents - a mulatto woman and a white man - couldn't marry because state law forbade it.

That freed slave eventually became an Episcopal bishop, and all ten of his children became college-educated professionals. Bessie became the second black woman to practice dentistry in New York. S I read this book about ten years ago and I still remember how much I enjoyed it. Sadie became the first black home economics teacher in a New York high school. They saw tremendous change and evolution in the world, over the course of their lives.

They were born in South Carolina during the mid s, experiencing racism firsthand as two educated African-American women , met many individuals who were instrumental in adding art, culture and brilliance to the Harlem Renaissance, and lived through the civil rights era to the early 's. It is a fascinating look at history through the eyes of those who lived it. Sep 24, Joy H. I listened to the audio version of this book. It was read by Whoopi Goldberg who did a great job of narrating the story about the two black Delany sisters who managed to break racial and gender barriers in the early s.

An enjoyable and uplifting read. According to Wiki, the authors were the aunts of science fiction writer Samuel R. Delany , the son of their youngest brother. How many folks are you acquainted with who are over one hundred years old? Well, here is an oral history-style book that gives you that chance to get to know not one, but two such women -- remarkable ones at that.

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"Having Our Say," was an interesting chronicle of two colored women growing up during the 's. As I read this book I realized how amazing these two women really were. They grew up during a time when most people didn't attend college especially women. All 10 of the Delany children were college 3/5(4).

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Essays and criticism on A. Elizabeth Delany, Sarah Delany, Amy Hill Hearth's Having Our Say - Critical Essays. Free Essay: Having Our Say “The truth is you’re born a certain way and there’s some things you can change and some things you can’t” One of the many smart.

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Having Our Say is a detailed narrative report on the lives of Sadie and Bessie Delany, two elderly African-American sisters, who are finally having their say. Now that the people who kept them down is long gone, Sadie and Bessie tell the stories of their fascinating lives, from their Southern Methodist school upbringing to their involvement in. In the book Having Our Say The Delany Sisters’ First Years The Delany sisters faced many challenges because they were sheltered, educated and black African American females. The Delany sisters grew up at Saint Augustine’s school in Raleigh, NC.