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What does the Dark and Darkness represent in Emily Dickinson's "We Grow Accustomed To the Dark?"

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❶Do I have style? Dickinson is not saying this will be easy.

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We Grow Accustomed to the Dark Lyrics
Acquainted With the Night
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Comments 0 Please log in to add your comment. The poems were not named simply because she had never intended for them to be published. However, the title has significant meaning to us as becoming use to hardships that life brings, possibly in the form of death or sickness.

The tone of the poem is melanholy and one of dejection, but after the shift, stanza 4 it shifts to a more hopeful tone. The mood of the poem is gloomy and desolate, but after the shift stanza 4 , it changes to create a more optimistic mood. The second shift occurs in stanza 4 when there is a change in the tone and mood of the poem.

Paraphrase Stanza 1 We grow accustomed to the Dark -- When light is put away -- As when the Neighbor holds the Lamp To witness her Goodbye -- We are forced to get used to hardships when we are left alone and there are no distractions. Stanza 2 A Moment -- We uncertain step For newness of the night -- Then -- fit our Vision to the Dark -- And meet the Road -- erect -- We adapt our life to focus on the obstacles and hardships.

Stanza 3 And so of larger -- Darkness -- Those Evenings of the Brain -- When not a Moon disclose a sign -- Or Star -- come out -- within -- There are nights when the sorrows is plaguing your thoughts when not even lustrous hopes or distant goals can save you from yourself Stanza 4 The Bravest -- grope a little -- And sometimes hit a Tree Directly in the Forehead -- But as they learn to see -- The bravest face their inner demons head on, sometimes being struck uglier and sicker side of life, yet they persist and see beyond the ugly side of life.

Stanza 5 Either the Darkness alters -- Or something in the sight Adjusts itself to Midnight -- And Life steps almost straight again Either the struggles shape you or you learn to shape your struggles and rise above them to continue on with your life. We grow accustomed to the Dark -- When light is put away -- As when the Neighbor holds the Lamp To witness her Goodbye -- A Moment -- We uncertain step For newness of the night -- Then -- fit our Vision to the Dark -- And meet the Road -- erect -- Newness of the night is an alliteration that creates a sense of peace that contrasts the current sense of distortment the poet is obviously feeling during this time of her life.

Road is a symbol of life or the path that life takes you. Roads can twist and turn which makes it a suitable comparison for life. It was a universal symbol during this time period, and was used by many, including Robert Frost. And so of larger -- Darkness -- Those Evenings of the Brain -- When not a Moon disclose a sign -- Or Star -- come out -- within -- Moon and Star are both used as symbols of hope or of a far out of reach goal that makes all the obstacles worth something.

And the fact that they cannot help you suggests that this is a journey undertaken alone and ones struggles cannot be overcome by hope, acceptance and understanding is necessary.

The tree is a symbol for life. Trees can be used to display sickness, as one branch can poison the whole tree if it is not cut away. The bravest people take a step forward in the darkness and are smacked with the branches or the hard labors of life. Yet if they keep moving closer, they learn the shape of the tree and can touch the trunk of the tree that is makes up core of the tree and represents stability of the tree and the light can begin to shine through the tree branches. Dark is symbolized throughout the poem as ignorance, obstacles and struggles while light is knowledge and purity.

This poem explores the constant battle against darkness, and how most people choose to accept and live with it while others fight to escape its clutches and find the light Darkness is a symbol for the hopelessness and desolate nature of loss or hardships. At a certain point, your eyes do adjust and you are able to move forward, although you may be apprehensive and your steps might be uncertain. In the remaining stanzas, Dickinson shifts from the word "Dark" to "Darkness" and this is more figurative, metaphorical.

Just as our eyes can eventually adjust to the "Dark," our brains can adjust to the problems of mental darkness. In the end, "the Darkness alters" things get better , or we become better at dealing with things:. In this poem, the words "dark" and "darkness" refer to the unknown. The poem is saying that there are many things that are unknown to us in life. These things tend to frighten us but we, eventually, get used to them and are able to deal with life as it comes.

You can see this idea quite clearly, for example, in the second stanza. There, Dickinson gives us the image of stepping out into the dark and needing to take a moment to get used to it. She brutally and honestly shows how the bravest are stopped by a meager tree in their groping towards a better life. Still, even as they attempt to make it in the new world, a tree comes and smacks them in the forehead.

Yet another obstacle, which is barring their path, and this tree, adds much insult to injury. The poem concludes by relating the darkness to ones perception of their surroundings, and presents the idea that in order to make it in the new world without light, one must change their perception of what really constitutes lightness in their life.

If they are unable to change their opinions on their perception of light, then to get on in their life something in the darkness itself must alter, such as a new object situation restoring some of the light. Dickinson illustrates that by coming to terms with the darkness, one can get their life back on track, but it will never be as straight as it was before.

We Grow Accustomed to the Dark Analysis. Accessed September 14, Leave your email and we will send you an example after 24 hours If you contact us after hours, we'll get back to you in 24 hours or less. How to cite this page Choose cite format:

We Grow Accustomed to the Dark

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Technical analysis of We Grow Accustomed to the Dark literary devices and the technique of Emily Dickinson Skip to navigation; Skip to content We Grow Accustomed to the Dark Analysis. Symbols, Imagery, Wordplay for sure. Or is it? Because Dickinson is using figurative language, we aren Sound Check. Easy .

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We Grow Accustomed To The Dark Analysis Emily Dickinson critical analysis of poem, review school overview. Analysis of the poem. literary terms. Definition terms. Why did he use? short summary describing. We Grow Accustomed To The Dark Analysis Emily Dickinson Characters archetypes.

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We Grow Accustomed To The Dark by Emily onlinepersonalloansforpeoplewithbadcredit.cf grow accustomed to the Dark When light is put away As when the Neighbor holds the Lamp To witness her Goodbye A Moment We uncertain step For. Page/5(4). Dickinson tackled some of the darkest parts of life and human nature, and she did so in a style that was all her own. “We Grow Accustomed to the Dark” is a poem about the scarier aspects of life, like facing the future with little idea of how to proceed, or walking into the night with no light to guide us.

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Apr 20,  · "Dark" and "Light" in this poem are states of being, but are not moralized like they are in so many other poems. Light is not some state of goodness and purity, Dark is not mired in immorality and Sin. Rather, they are much closer to their literal counterparts, light and its absence. We Grow Accustomed to the Dark Analysis. By ***** ***** In the poem We Grow Accustomed to the Dark, by Emily Dickinson, a loss is described in detail using a metaphor of darkness and light. Dickinson uses metaphors, strong imagery, and the way the poem is written in order to describe the loss of a loved one in her life.5/5(2).