Skip Nav

Four Different Types of Writing Styles: Expository, Descriptive, Persuasive, and Narrative

Four Types of Writing

❶You might even want to have someone else read over your essay to make sure everything makes sense.

Question 1: Name Your Business

Personal Narrative Genre
Teaching Narrative Writing
Download our FREE Preview Packs!

Explore over 4, video courses. Find a degree that fits your goals. Narrative Techniques in Writing: Try it risk-free for 30 days. An error occurred trying to load this video.

Try refreshing the page, or contact customer support. You must create an account to continue watching. Register to view this lesson Are you a student or a teacher?

I am a student I am a teacher. What teachers are saying about Study. Are you still watching? Your next lesson will play in 10 seconds. Add to Add to Add to. Want to watch this again later?

Walt Whitman's Poetry and Transcendentalism. Plot Techniques in American Fiction: Role of the Narrator in American Novels: How Structure Affects the Style of a Text.

What is Narrative Writing? Language Analysis in Literature: Analyzing the American Short Story: How to Analyze Settings in Literature: High School Physical Science: Prentice Hall Algebra 1: Definition of Narrative Technique Narratives are works that provide an account of connected events.

Types of Narrative Techniques There are many literary techniques, but for this lesson, we will examine literary techniques relevant to style, plot, and narrative perspective, or point of view.

Examples of Narrative Techniques in Style The style a writer uses is seen in the diction, or the language used. Examples of Narrative Techniques in Plot When we think of the common techniques relevant to plots, we think of a certain sequence of events.

Try it risk-free No obligation, cancel anytime. Want to learn more? Select a subject to preview related courses: Examples in Narrative Perspective Narrative perspective, also referred to as the narrative voice or point of view, is the perspective from which the writer tells the story.

Lesson Summary Let's review. Explain what narrative technique are and what they add to a story Identify and describe the different narrative techniques for the style, plot, and perspective of a story. Unlock Your Education See for yourself why 30 million people use Study.

Become a Member Already a member? Earning College Credit Did you know… We have over college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1, colleges and universities. To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page Transferring credit to the school of your choice Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Browse Articles By Category Browse an area of study or degree level.

Write Right Learn Writing in the Blogosphere: Top 10 Writing Blogs Break that Block: Five Fun Writing Prompts. Become a Research Biologist: You are viewing lesson Lesson 6 in chapter 43 of the course:.

Help and Review 44 chapters lessons 26 flashcard sets. ACT - About the Test: ACT English - Punctuation: ACT English - Organization: ACT English - Style: ACT Math - Overview: ACT Math - Radicals: ACT Math - Functions: ACT Math - Matrices: ACT Math - Inequalities: ACT Math - Probability: ACT Math - Exponents: ACT Math - Polynomials and ACT Math - Sequences: ACT Math - Exponentials and ACT Math - Triangles: ACT Math - Trigonometry: ACT Science Reasoning ACT Reading - Overview: ACT Reading - Understanding ACT Reading - Practice: ACT Writing - Overview: ACT Writing - Planning: Tutoring Solution AP Biology: Help and Review AP Biology: Tutoring Solution 10th Grade English: Homework Help Resource 10th Grade English: It helps to limit things as much as possible.

While it might seem like we need to know a bunch of specific details from your senior year, try to think of a particularly tumultuous day from that year and tell us that story. Where does that story start? Not the first day of school that year.

Find a better starting point. If you want to tell the story of your prom night, does it start when you get dressed? Does it start when you spill spaghetti sauce all down your dress before the dance?

While that might seem like the climax of a story you want to tell, it might make a better starting place. Go straight to the drama. You don't need to write up a formal outline for a narrative essay unless it's part of the assignment or it really helps you write. Listing the major scenes that need to be a part of the story will help you get organized and find a good place to start. Use a consistent point of view. Generally, narrative essays will be written in first person, making use of "I" statements, which is a little unusual compared to other assignments you'll be given in school.

Whether you're giving us scenes with dialog, or discussing what happened in past-tense, it's perfectly fine to use first person in a narrative essay. This is a difficult and advanced technique to try to pull off, and it usually has the effect of being too complicated.

There should only be one "I" in the story. In general, narrative essays and short stories for that matter should also be told in past tense. So, you would write "Johnny and I walked to the store every Thursday" not "Johnny and I are walking to the store, like we do every Thursday.

If so, be consistent with your pronouns throughout the story. Describe the important characters. Who else is important to the story, other than yourself? Who else was present when the story took place. Who affected the outcome of the story? What specific, particular details can you remember about the people in the story? Use these to help build the characters into real people. Particular details are specific and only particular to the character being described.

While it may be specific to say that your friend has brown hair, green eyes, is 5 feet tall with an athletic build, these things don't tell us much about the character. The fact that he only wears silk dragon shirts? Now that gives us something interesting. Try writing up a brief sketch of each principal character in your narrative essay, along with the specific details you remember about them. Pick a few essentials. Find the antagonist and conflict. Good narratives often have a protagonist and an antagonist, which is what creates the conflict.

The protagonist is usually the main character in most narrative essays, that'll be you who is struggling with something. It might be a situation, a condition, or a force, but whatever the case, a protagonist wants something and the reader roots for them. The antagonist is the thing or person who keeps the protagonist from getting what they want.

Who or what is the antagonist in your story? To answer this question, you also need to find out what the protagonist wants. What is the goal? What's the best case scenario for the protagonist? What stands in the protagonist's way? The antagonist isn't "the bad guy" of the story, necessarily, and not every story has a clear antagonist.

Also keep in mind that for some good personal narratives, you might be the antagonist yourself. Just as important to a good story as the characters and the plot is the setting.

Where does the story take place? In the city or the country? Describe the location that the story takes place and let the setting become part of your story.

Do a freewrite about the location that your story takes place. What do you know about the place? What can you remember? What can you find out? If you do any research for your narrative essay, it will probably be here. Try to find out extra details about the setting of your story, or double-check your memory to make sure it's right.

Good writing is in the details. Even the most boring office environment or the dullest town can be made compelling with the right kinds of details in the writing. Remember to use particulars—unique details that don't describe anything else but the specific thing you're writing about, and let these vivid details drive the story.

You might tell us something like, "My dad was always sad that year," but if you wrote "Dad never spoke when he got home from work. We heard his truck, then heard as he laid his battered hardhat on the kitchen table. Then we heard him sigh deeply and take off his work clothes, which were stained with grease.

Make sure your theme is clearly illustrated in the story. After you've written your rough draft, read back over it with an eye for your theme.

Whatever the purpose of your telling us the story that you're telling us needs to be made very clear. The last thing you want is for the reader to get to the end and say, "Good story, but who cares? Get the theme into the very beginning of the essay. Just as a researched argument essay needs to have a thesis statement somewhere in the first few paragraphs of the essay, a narrative essay needs a topic statement or a thesis statement to explain the main idea of the story.

This isn't "ruining the surprise" of the story, this is foreshadowing the important themes and details to notice over the course of the story as you tell it. A good writer doesn't need suspense in a narrative essay. The ending should seem inevitable. Use scenes and analyses. All narratives are made of two kinds of writing: Scenes happen when you need to slow down and tell specific details about an important moment of the story.

Scenes are small moments that take a while to read. An analysis is used to narrate the time between scenes. They are longer moments that you read over more quickly.

I didn't know what to tell him. I fidgeted, kicked an empty paint bucket that was rusted over at the edge of the lot. We got a turkey, cornbread, cranberries. The store was crazy-packed with happy holiday shoppers, but we walked through them all, not saying a word to each other. It took forever to lug it all home. Use and format dialogue correctly.

When you're writing a narrative essay, it's typically somewhere between a short story and a regular essay that you might write for school. You'll have to be familiar with the conventions of formatting both types of writing, and since most narrative essays will involve some dialogue, you should make formatting that dialogue correctly a part of your revision process. Anything spoken by a character out loud needs to be included in quotation marks and attributed to the character speaking it: Each time a new character speaks, you need to make a new paragraph.

If the same character speaks, multiple instances of dialog can exist in the same paragraph. Revision is the most important part of writing. Nobody, even the most experienced writers, get it right on the very first run through. Get a draft finished ahead of time and give yourself the chance to go back through your story carefully and see it again.

How could it be improved? Revise for clarity first. Are your main points clear? There are several ways to accomplish exposition. Indirect exposition , sometimes called incluing , is a technique of worldbuilding in which the reader is gradually exposed to background information about the world in which a story is set.

The idea is to clue the readers in to the world the author is building without them being aware of it. This can be done in a number of ways: Indirect exposition has always occurred in storytelling incidentally, but is first clearly identified, in the modern literary world, in the writing of Rudyard Kipling.

In his stories set in India like The Jungle Book , Kipling was faced with the problem of Western readers not knowing the culture and environment of that land, so he gradually developed the technique of explaining through example. But this was relatively subtle, compared to Kiplings' science fiction stories, where he used the technique much more obviously and necessarily, to explain an entirely fantastic world unknown to any reader, in his Aerial Board of Control universe.

Kipling's writing influenced other science fiction writers, most notably the "Dean of Science Fiction", Robert Heinlein , who became known for his advanced rhetorical and storytelling techniques, including indirect exposition. The word incluing is attributed to fantasy and science fiction author Jo Walton.

Frequently bought together

Main Topics

Privacy Policy

Writing a narrative essay is an essential talent for field research. It presents your experience and allows audiences to draw their own conclusions.

Privacy FAQs

Narrative Writing is winner of the Richard Meade Award, given by the National Council of Teacher's of English. George Hillocks, Jr. is a master teacher who has had great success working with kids in the Chicago Public Schools for over thirty years.

About Our Ads

onlinepersonalloansforpeoplewithbadcredit.cf: Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft (9th Edition) (): Janet Burroway, Elizabeth Stuckey-French, Ned Stuckey-French: Books. Buy essay online at professional essay writing service. Order custom research academic papers from the best trusted company. Just find a great help for students in need. Lowest prices, first-rate place and eagerness to work on any type, topic, page count or level of assignment you want.

Cookie Info

Expert Reviewed. How to Write a Narrative Essay. Four Parts: Choosing a Good Topic Writing a Draft Revising Your Essay Sample Essay Community Q&A Narrative essays are commonly assigned pieces of writing at different stages through school. Studybay is an academic writing service for students: essays, term papers, dissertations and much more! We're trusted and chosen by many students all over the world!