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How to Write an Interview Essay (5 Different Types)

How to Write an Interview Essay: Prepare an Outline

❶Organizing the Notes of the Interview Narrative format or question and answer format? Draw up a list of the questions you are prepared to ask.

Overview of the Interview Essay Process

How to Write an Interview Essay
5 Interview Essay Examples: Choose Your Type
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Rank your questions in order of importance to make sure you ask your best ones, or list them all in the order you'd ask them and color-code the most important ones. Arrange the interview s.

You'll need to contact the interviewee or his or her representative to arrange a time and place to conduct the interview. You'll also need permission to record the interview with either audio or video equipment, or to take photographs.

Be sure the person you contact knows who you are and why you want to interview him or her. A library, restaurant, or campus location if you're doing this for a college writing class would be suitable. You may want to get the interviewee's consent to use his or her comments in your essay in writing, as well as permission to record those comments during the interview.

By law, if you are recording an interview conducted over the phone, you must obtain written permission. Be on time at the place you've agreed to meet for the interview. Conduct the interview s. Even if you are using a recording device, take notes during the interview, as they can help you look for specific points in the recording to incorporate into the essay. Be patient and respectful as you ask your questions and wait for responses. Give the interviewee time to reflect, and you will likely be rewarded with more insightful answers.

A few deeper responses are usually better than many superficial ones. Immediately after the interview, write down your thoughts and impressions about the interview and interviewee. They may help you shape the essay. Always end the interview by thanking the person. Decide what format your interview essay will have. If the essay is a class assignment, the format will likely be pre-determined. Clarify with your instructor whether he or she expects questions and answers, long quotations, or paraphrasing, and if the primary focus should be the interview itself or in placing it in a larger context.

This form allows paraphrasing of some information the interviewee says, along with direct quotes for the material you most want to emphasize. This is the most likely format for a class assignment, and offers the most opportunity to add context and analysis. This is a looser format than the formal writing style required for most essays. You can address the reader directly and use both first and second person. This format can be suitable for anything from class assignments to magazine articles.

This form presents your questions to the interviewee, followed by the interviewee's responses. That is, the text looks something like this: How long have you been in the circus? These are always direct quotes, although you may insert explanatory material in parentheses and substitutions, such as a person's name in place of a personal pronoun, in brackets.

This format is best suited for essays with only a single interviewee or a closely related group, such as spouses or the core cast of a TV show. Plan an outline of the essay. The outline will depend largely on the essay format you are following, but a strong introduction, which clearly identifies your subject and the goals and focus of your interview, is always important.

Utilizing both whenever available will allow you to thoroughly consider both the highlights of the interview and the most significant themes to emerge from it. These, in turn, will inform your outline of what information your essay will cover and how it will appear. Traditional school essays often utilize a five paragraph format introduction, three supporting paragraphs, conclusion , and this can often work with interview essays as well.

Develop a thesis statement. If the purpose of your essay is only to present your interviewee to your reader, your thesis will likely be a brief summary identifying the person and his or her background, accomplishments, and qualifications.

See How to Write a Thesis Statement for more advice. Flesh out your essay. The body of your essay needs to follow the selected format while supporting the thesis and providing substantial coverage of the actual interview.

Interviews can sometimes produce a good deal of repetitive answers even with high-quality questions , so you may need to trim repetitions and unnecessary elements from the body of your essay. Make sure that whatever material you do keep remains true to both the spirit of the interview and the overarching focus of your essay. Proofread and revise your work. Any type of essay, including interview essays, should be thoroughly proofread and carefully revised to provide maximum clarity and impact.

Reading over the essay yourself is a good start, but it is always wise to have another set of eyes look it over as well. Another reader is likely to catch errors, repetitions, and unclear sections that you have glossed over. Layers of editing and revising can sometimes cause the essay to drift away from the original source and intent. You may even want to let the interviewee read it over to ensure that it captures his or her voice. Depending on your assignment, you may not need to explicitly cite the interview itself, but always check to make sure.

Always cite any supplemental materials, however. Make sure one more time that any direct quotations from your source are placed in quotation marks, and any paraphrasing is done without quotation marks. Don't put words in your subject's mouth, and respect the words that do emerge from it. Is there a way to avoid question and answer sessions during interviews?

Not if the interview is in person! A job interview is by definition a question and answer session. If you really want the job or position and you know your stuff, you should have no problem answering any questions. Not Helpful 9 Helpful Pick a catchy title. Use the title as your statement, then explain what you meant by it.

Write down your thoughts from the interview while the conversation is fresh to ensure that you include not only the vital facts but also any nuances or important details. Don't worry about writing the story or essay at this point -- essay editing comes later in the process. Reread your notes or listen to your tape again. Include the intention for the interview in your first paragraph, or lead, which should be short and to the point. Make a quick outline or list that includes the points you want to add to your essay.

Then, revise to include this additional information. Refine and create the essay. Now is when you make your interview essay "pretty. Be sure you can understand what the source said and include quotes and attribute them to the source. Also, try to use different language when referring to the source. Instead of constantly using "said Mr. Jones," try other verbs, such as commented or reported. Have someone else read your essay. Ask your proofreader to look for typos and grammatical errors along with the content.

If you've never written an interview essay, ask the reviewer to consider the format and style, too. Keep the source on track during your talk, but don't worry if one question leads to another and you divert from your list. Gina Ragusa has made a career out of writing for the past 15 years, with an emphasis on financial institution writing. Tips Keep the source on track during your talk, but don't worry if one question leads to another and you divert from your list.

Be approachable and make sure your source is comfortable talking with you.

What Is an Interview Essay?

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First, you need to know if your teacher wants you to write the essay in a narrative format or in a question answer format. This will affect how you organize your paper. Both essay formats need a strong introduction, an organized body and a solid conclusion.

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Jan 17,  · Make the Essay Meaningful: These sorts of papers can be especially meaningful if you write them about family members or interview people who do a job or activity you would like to try yourself. Where You Can Find Interview Essays: These papers are familiar to anyone who reads a newspaper or magazine. While people Reviews: 7.

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Jul 01,  · The APA interview writing format has specific rules for how to write an interview paper. Explain the Interview. The APA format for interviews expects you to explain the clear purpose of your interview. You should not use an interview for information that can be obtained elsewhere, such as publications or online sources. . Before you finish the interview, have your notes or recording in order. Ask the source if you can call or visit her again for follow-up questions. Write the Interview Essay. Write down your thoughts from the interview while the conversation is fresh to ensure that you include not only the vital facts but also any nuances or important details.

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Sure, you’re writing the paper because it’s an assignment, and you need to write it in order to pass your class. But you also need to check the assignment guidelines to learn the paper’s purpose. In most cases, you’ll be writing an interview essay to illustrate a dominant impression of the person you’re interviewing. You could write to show your . How to Write an Interview Essay: Prepare an Outline Interview essay format is another important information to discuss. The text of this type is formatted according to the existing academic writing standards (MLA referencing style, APA, Chicago, etc.) Dedicate enough time to studying different writing styles not to fail this mission. Pay attention to the way .